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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 10:41 am 
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Hi everyone! First time kit builder here. :D
I got my Tremolito and found it nearly impossible to discern the color codes on the resistors.
I'm super impressed and want to learn your magic if you guys can quickly and easily read them after time. lol
Once I'd tried to sort the resistors I followed the assembly instructions. But the pedal is not yet functioning.
I get my bypass signal 100%. When I engage the pedal. I get the LED and again, strong clear signal.
But no function whatsoever from the pots and no effect. Interestingly the TRIM pot is actively adjusting the signal coming through when engaged.
My strong suspicion is that I have resistors swapped unwittingly. I'm including a link to photos of each resistor labeled as what I thought it was.
As well as board and wiring shots. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1szSoq ... ZovzWe_Xwl

I was so confused by the resistors that there was literally one that I only determined by ruling it out until it was the last one. So again, I question if I got all that right. To be clear, when I say I'm confused by the resistors. I don't mean how to read them. I mean I can't discern what the colors are meant to be.
It seems like the colors are somewhat variable and there were a couple that simply didn't seem to fit the descriptions in the instructions at all. (Or so I thought)

Pics: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1szSoq ... ZovzWe_Xwl

THANKS FOR YOUR HELP
Pete


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 10:55 am 
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I didn't check your color bands yet. I am very slow at that; in fact, I never do it on my own builds, preferring to use a multimeter to test them instead. Someone else can do it faster if it proves necessary.

I would say the problem is at least as likely to be your soldering, which could use some improvement. Try reflowing all your solder joints. This post has lots of details about that. Most of your joints look like they could use some more solder.

Also look at Stephen's Tips For A Successful Build if you haven't read through it yet. That post will give you lots of good example photos of what your solder joints and wire connections should look like.

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 11:07 am 
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*Edit* Every Solder joint shows no resistance between it an it's neighbors after checking each solder job...

I was longing add certainty by checking them on the Mulimeter! That brings up another newbie question. With my extremely cheap meter.
Can I accurately test these values of resistors? It seemed like I would get vague readings from some of the values. But I might need a digital meter to play ball like this?


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 11:47 am 
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Hi, Peter. I'm pretty sure you're the same Peter Wilson I sold my Epiphone Elitist LP to several years back. My real name is Bob Matthews. Glad to see that you're trying your hand at pedal building. It's a great addiction, er, hobby!

Scott's comments re: the quality of your soldering are spot on. Very typical for novice builders, so absolutely nothing to be embarrassed about. Read through the links he provided re: how to improve your solder joint quality. If you have an electronics supply store around, you might want to pick up a small PCB and a bag of cheap components (diodes or resistors) to practice with.

Re: your identification of the resistors, you did very well overall. Two problems, and one of them doesn't appear to be yours:

  • The tan resistor is the 18K (183), so that one needs to be moved from the spot below the sheep on the right side of the PCB to the spot above it. Your confusion about this resistor is easy to understand, because it's a carbon film type and has a 4-band color code rather than the 5-band code that is used on the blue metal film resistors. BYOC often has to substitute carbon film resistors for some of the more uncommonly used sizes. There's info on the different kinds of resistor color coding here: http://byocelectronics.com/resistorcodes.pdf
  • The resistor currently in that spot above the sheep is the one you had identified as the 18K, but is in fact a 7.2M (725, purple-red-black-yellow-brown) resistor, which is not supposed to be included in this kit. Please contact sales@buildyourownclone.com and request that they send you the correct 2.2M (225) resistor. They will do this quickly and at no cost to you.

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My Website * My Musical Gear * My DIY Pedals: Pg.1 - Pg.2


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 12:16 pm 
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You were pretty close. You've got the 2.2M (225) and 18k (183) resistors mixed up.

2.2m is red/red/black/yellow/brown. This is a 1% metal film resistor. The body of the resistor will be a light blue color. Metal film resistors have 5 stripes. The 5th stripe tells you it has a 1% tolerance.

18k is brown/gray/orange/gold. This is a 5% carbon film resistor. The body of the resistor will be a light tan color. Carbon film resistors have 4 strips. The 4th strip tells you it has a 5% tolerance.

The number system goes in the order of the rainbow starting at red and ending at violet - red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, where red = 2 and violet = 7. You must extrapolate in both directions to get 0 - 9. Think of infrared when you extrapolate to the left, where brown = 1 and black = 0. Think of ultraviolet when you extrapolate to the right where gray = 8 and white = 9.

black = 0
brown = 1
red = 2
orange = 3
yellow = 4
green = 5
blue = 6
violet = 7
gray = 8
white = 9

To determine the value of the resistor with 4-band 5% tolerance code, you take the first two stripes at face value. The 3rd stripe tells you how many zeroes to add to the end. The 4th gold stripe just tells you that it has a 5% tolerance. So for the 18k resistor you have:

brown = 1
gray = 8
orange = 3

which is 18 with 000 on the end, or 18000, or 18k


To determine the value of a resistor with 5-band 1% tolerance code, you take the first 3 stripes at face value. The 4th stripe tells you how many zeroes to add to the end. The 5th brown stripe just tells you that it has a 1% tolerance. So for the 2.2M resistor you have:

red = 2
red = 2
black = 0
yellow = 4

which is 220 with 0000 on the end, or 2200000, or 2.2M, or 2M2.



Be careful when the last stipe at the end that tells you how many zeroes to add is a zero. For example, a 470ohm 1% would be:
yellow = 4
violet = 7
black = 0
black = 0

which is 470 with nothing added to the end.

Or a 22ohm 5% would be:
red = 2
red = 2
black = 0

which is 22 with nothing added to the end.


There is one other tricky thing and it only deals with 1% 5-band resistors. 1% resistors have an 11th color band, which is gold. When you see a gold band on a 1% resistor, it means you should omit that band and the preceding band completely. Or another way to think of it, is when you see a gold band on a 1% code, only use the first 3 bands as if it were a 5% 3-band code. You will only see this for values that are less than 100ohms. This is because you only need 3 bands for a value that only has 2 digits.

yellow = 4
violet = 7
black = 0
gold = treat like 3 band code

which is 47 with nothing added to the end.

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Please do not PM me. email is prefered. keith@buildyourownclone.com


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 12:48 pm 
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All duly noted. I’m appreciating the quick responses and i’m checking it all out.
And Bob, you rock for remembering me! That was a nice turnaround from racking my brains out not understanding what I was missing last night :idea:


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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 10:33 am 
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After exchanging messages with Nick and Keith, they've convinced me that the resistor I thought was a 7.2M is in fact the 2.2M. The apparent purple color of the first band is probably just a lightly painted red band with the blue of the resistor body showing through it, making it appear purple. Apparently, their resistor supplier doesn't even offer a 7.2M size.

So that's good news for you--just swap the positions of those two resistors above and below the sheep and see where you're at. Don't be too surprised if the pedal still doesn't work, and try working through the solder joint clean-up process linked by Scott above if that's the case.


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“My favorite programming language is SOLDER” - Bob Pease (RIP)

My Website * My Musical Gear * My DIY Pedals: Pg.1 - Pg.2
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 11:01 am 
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https://www.mouser.com/datasheet/2/351/ ... 218702.pdf

The 1% metal film only go up to 2.2M. We need to use carbon film if we need a higher value.

https://www.mouser.com/datasheet/2/351/ ... 201685.pdf

But even in 5% carbon film, 7M2 isn't a value that exists. It's pretty common to have some variation in the color of the bands. Sometimes you get an orange band that's bit more on the red side. Sometimes you get a red band that's a bit more on the brown side. I've even seen some brown bands that looked a bit purple. I've never seen one that had two bands of the same color, such as this one, where one was correct and the other was off, but I'm pretty sure that's the case with this particular 2M2 resistor.

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Please do not PM me. email is prefered. keith@buildyourownclone.com


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