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PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2024 9:37 am 
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I just built a Silver Pony. And while it seems to work fine and sounds great, it makes a loud pop through the amp whenever it is turned on and off. Is this to be expected, or is there a fix for this?


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2024 10:56 am 
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Unfortunately, this can happen with true bypass pedals. The amount of pop can vary a lot from rig to rig. A really bad pop is often a sign of some ground in issues...usually not associated with the pedal.

You can add a pull down resistor to try to reduce the pop. You'd do this by connecting a resistor between the #5 and #2 footswitch eyelets. Or converting to non-true bypass.

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2024 11:02 am 
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Which resistor would do the trick? I have the same issue with a few pedals.


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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2024 4:49 pm 
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Keith - I gave that a try - I used a 220K resistor from pin 2 to 5, but I didn't really notice a difference. It's a pretty loud pop, so I'd be interested in converting it to non-true bypass. But I don't have a clue where to start. I've read about buffered bypass modules, but I'm not sure if they are applicable to my pedal.

If most true bypass pedals pop like this one, I really don't understand why people like them.


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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2024 1:18 pm 
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rockybottom16 wrote:
If most true bypass pedals pop like this one, I really don't understand why people like them.

It's certainly not the case that "most true bypass pedals pop"--in fact, it's quite unusual in my experience. I've built well over 200 BYOC kits that are true bypass and have only encountered switch pop on a handful. True bypass pedals remain so popular because they avoid a variety of sonic problems that can occur when effect circuits are not isolated from the signal path when not in use. But the unfortunate truth is that when switch pop does occur, it can be very difficult to chase down & eliminate.

I'll defer to Keith/byoc to describe how best to convert your SP to non-true bypass.

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2024 1:20 pm 
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Itspiv wrote:
Which resistor would do the trick? I have the same issue with a few pedals.

1 Mohm resistors are commonly used for this purpose. But this is no guaranteed fix for the problem--sometimes works, sometimes doesn't.

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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2024 6:41 am 
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duhvoodooman wrote:
rockybottom16 wrote:
If most true bypass pedals pop like this one, I really don't understand why people like them.

It's certainly not the case that "most true bypass pedals pop"--in fact, it's quite unusual in my experience. I've built well over 200 BYOC kits that are true bypass and have only encountered switch pop on a handful. True bypass pedals remain so popular because they avoid a variety of sonic problems that can occur when effect circuits are not isolated from the signal path when not in use. But the unfortunate truth is that when switch pop does occur, it can be very difficult to chase down & eliminate.

I'll defer to Keith/byoc to describe how best to convert your SP to non-true bypass.

Do you think it would be worth my while to replace the input and output capacitors in case one of them is not quite up to the task? Seems to me that might be a good place to start. Adding resistors seems to have no effect.


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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2024 12:20 pm 
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rockybottom16 wrote:
duhvoodooman wrote:
rockybottom16 wrote:
If most true bypass pedals pop like this one, I really don't understand why people like them.

It's certainly not the case that "most true bypass pedals pop"--in fact, it's quite unusual in my experience. I've built well over 200 BYOC kits that are true bypass and have only encountered switch pop on a handful. True bypass pedals remain so popular because they avoid a variety of sonic problems that can occur when effect circuits are not isolated from the signal path when not in use. But the unfortunate truth is that when switch pop does occur, it can be very difficult to chase down & eliminate.

I'll defer to Keith/byoc to describe how best to convert your SP to non-true bypass.

Do you think it would be worth my while to replace the input and output capacitors in case one of them is not quite up to the task? Seems to me that might be a good place to start. Adding resistors seems to have no effect.

If you have the time, the caps, and feel confident in your desoldering capabilities, it can't hurt to try. But just understand, you're taking a shot in the dark. You can poke around online and see that there are a lot of theories as to why foot switch pop occurs, but the truth is, no one has yet been able to truly identify the cause, nor come up with a solution.

I'd try this first: Take the pedal somewhere else and test it. Like to a friend's house on a completely different rig or if you have a rehearsal/studio space. Somewhere completely different, particularly with a different amp and totally different AC wiring in the walls. If it behaves the same, then you can start to assume (but still not be entirely certain) that the problem is in the pedal. Because, like I said early, in my experience, this problem has more to do with environmental variables.

If you still want to convert it to non-true bypass after that, then I'll explain how.

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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2024 12:58 pm 
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byoc wrote:
I'd try this first: Take the pedal somewhere else and test it. Like to a friend's house on a completely different rig or if you have a rehearsal/studio space. Somewhere completely different, particularly with a different amp and totally different AC wiring in the walls. If it behaves the same, then you can start to assume (but still not be entirely certain) that the problem is in the pedal. Because, like I said early, in my experience, this problem has more to do with environmental variables.

I might add one thing to this excellent suggestion by Keith: Before taking the pedal elsewhere to test it, try (1) changing the power source to a 9V battery, and (2) test it with a signal chain of just guitar-->Silver Pony-->amp. That would eliminate your power supply and other effects in your signal chain as possible causes.

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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2024 1:48 pm 
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Actually, trying it with a battery and isolating it with just the guitar and amp were the two things I tried first. My last build was the Spring Reverb pedal, and the noise problem I had with that ended up being the power supply. So I'm wary of those little buggers.

I did have the Silver Pony at the club rehearsing on Wednesday. It still popped, but it's usable. I realized that when I step on it during a song, I invariably hit it right on the down beat. So nobody would hear it anyway.


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